A Book Review of Indian Country: By Kurt Schlichter

A Book Review of Indian Country: By Kurt Schlichter

A friend asked me to do this review and give my impressions of the book’s fictional scenario and whether I thought the playing out of the events was realistic. I’ve never really done a book review before, so be kind, and I say that with all the sarcasm I can muster LOL. Flame on, this is just my semi educated opinion.  

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The Scenario

Hillary Rot-Damn Clinton wins the 2020 election and immediately starts to do what every one of us figured she would. This book begins in 2022 with the adventures of an Army Special Forces Captain named Kelly Turnbull. In 2022 he is running ops in Iraq, but then, mysteriously gets pulled from Army Command by a guy named “Clay” who works for what he calls an “Other Government Agency”.

U.S. Forces are being withdrawn from Iraq and Europe by Clinton and “Clay” wants Turnbull to help him finish up an operation in Iraq, then follow on by workin’ for him in the Continental US (Conus). “Clay” makes it clear that operations in Conus will be oriented towards protecting the U.S. Constitution and the Red’s (U.S.A.).

Fast forward to 2027. Elizabeth “I’m an Indian for College” Warren is President. The Nation is split into two countries. Blue (People’s Republic) and Red (USA). The primary story in this book takes place in Southern Indiana. The Northern Blue States are full of all the Commie laden crap you’d figure they would be. From the climate change requirements, to the PC BS, to the racial and “gender devoids” revenge being doled out by your typical “Disgruntled but now Empowered” minorities who now work in the government power structure.

Turnbull is given a mission to do what Special Forces does best, Unconventional Warfare. His job is to buy time and organize the locals to prove the Southern Indiana Area of Operation (AO) is not worth what it would cost the “Blues” to keep it. Thus begins the adventure in Jasper, Indiana where a Special Forces Officer has to organize, mentor and initially lead the seed of a resistance that grows into a force to be reckoned with.

I thought the book was well written and a story that not only is a realistic depiction of what unconventional warfare consists of and requires, from an organizational standpoint, but also gives people, who believe this will happen one day, a very basic understanding of the requirements necessary to make a resistance work.

I am a “Technical Details Nazi” when it comes to firearms and military facts in movies and books. To Kurt’s credit, there were only two minor thing I read that were wrong concerning firearms. I’m not sayin’ what they are, you can find them for yourself when you read it.

If you want a good read with a good, realistic story line, get a copy of this book. Hell, it’s only $4.99 on Kindle. There is a lot of “Apocalypse Porn” out there that is poorly organized, poorly researched and poorly written. This is not one of those books.

It is hard for me to put myself “In the event” of a book if the above requirements are not met. A good test for a book is when I am into the story enough to not only place myself there, but to come up with alternative courses of action (COA) to what takes place, and “war game” how it might have turned out differently in the book (and in the future) if only……………

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JCD

“Parata Vivere”- Live Prepared.

 

Firearms For Freedom and Forage-Part 4, Hunting Handguns

Firearms For Freedom and Forage-Part 4, Hunting Handguns

When it comes to hunting with a handgun, I very rarely have ever looked at the handgun as anything more than a back up or a convenience. I very rarely ever go hunting without a handgun, but it is used very little in comparison to my long guns. Having owned many pistols that people say are great for hunting, I’ve narrowed down my selection to only two that I consider necessities when it comes to “pistols for foraging”.

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Keep in mind what I am making my comparisons to. I have owned a 7.5″ Ruger Redhawk in .44Magnum, a 6″ GP-100 in .357Magnum, a 4″ Ruger Security Six in .357 Magnum, a Magna-ported 6″ S&W M29 in .44Magnum, and a 3″ S&W M317 in .22LR. They all did OK and shot well enough. As a matter of fact, the 6″ M29 was one of the most accurate Magnums I’ve own. These were cut from the “Herd” for various reasons which I will cover below.

Selection Criteria

Versatility

The things I weigh when making a firearms selection for a hunting handgun, starts first with versatility. This is the reason I choose a revolver for what Mel Tappan called a “Working Gun”. Revolvers can use reduced loads and birdshot loads as reliably as a regular, full power, factory load.

Accuracy

After versatility, comes accuracy. If a .22LR revolver won’t shoot “Minute of Squirrel” at 15 meters, it gets cut from the team. This is why the 3″ S&W M317 was sold. If my Magnum caliber handgun doesn’t shoot into four inches at 25 yards, it gets the boot.

Weight/Bulk

Lastly on the list is weight/bulk. While I like a handgun to be lightweight, a .44 Magnum that is lightweight is a “Masochist Special” in my book. On the other hand, a Ruger Redhawk with a 7.5″ barrel is not only too heavy for convenient carry, but it is way too bulky for a quick presentation if necessary. I’ve found the 6″ barreled revolvers I’ve owned to be a tad too long for convenient belt or “Tanker Holster” carry, so there goes the GP-100, Redhawk and 6″ M29.

Power

In big game hunting revolvers, I look for enough energy to do the job on the game I’m hunting. The .357 Magnum out of a 6″ barrel is in the “bare minimum” category for me. When you drop the .357 Magnum to 4″ barreled velocities, it doesn’t deliver near the downrange energy I’d like in that type of handgun and that nixed the Security Six.

I’m lookin for at least 700 foot pounds out of a handgun I carry when hunting big game. Although the .357 Magnum has some specialty loads that will do that, it averages around 500-550 ft lbs in common weights and bullet designs. At least the .44 Magnum out of everything from a 3″ barrel up will put out 700 ft. lbs. on target with most factory loads.

Reliability

When it comes to reliability, most revolvers will give you that, as long as you know what will cause problems with that type of action. The biggest issue I’ve seen with revolvers is after a lot of shooting, lead will build up on the forcing cone to the point that you need to clean/scrub it. You can do as I did in between relays in a “Firearms Instructors Course” in the 90’s and half cock the hammer while spinning the cylinder to knock the lead build up off (that is a last choice option BTW, and was completed while still on the “Line”) but that was done after we had fired hundreds of rounds through our weapons that day.

Availability

Finally, I look at what is commonly available in the “Mom and Pop” General stores. Usually you will see .357 Magnum and maybe .38 Special. There will usually be .44 Magnum, .45ACP, 9MM and always .22 Long and Long Rifle.

My Choices

Taurus 4″ M94 .22LR 

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4″ Taurus M94 .22LR in a Mil Surplus aviator shoulder holster with a folding knife sheath converted to carry three speedloaders. One speedoader always has 9 CB Long cartridges in it, due to how quiet they are.

The first pistol I selected is a Taurus M94, nine shot .22LR with a four inch barrel. I have had this pistol for about 15 years and it never fails to deliver when needed. It will shoot “Minute of Squirrel” out to 20 meters off a solid rest. I can’t tell you how many squirrels I’ve taken over the years just because I always had this firearm in my pack when I went out hunting.

It is convenient to carry not only because it is only a 4″ barrel, but because it is “J-Frame” sized (the same as the 5 shot, snub nosed revolvers) and relatively lightweight. It carries plenty of rounds to get the job done, and what I normally do is load CB Longs into the first and second chambers and the rest are CCI Mini Mags.

The sights are thin enough to make an accurate shot on small game, but still visible enough to see when the light starts to dim. I carry extra ammo for this pistol in HKS speedloaders for no other reason than it is more convenient than loose ammo in your pocket. If you compare the cost of the S&W M63 (a comparable pistol model) the Taurus M94 is half the price with most of the same attributes (the S&W DA trigger is smoother).

Smith and Wesson 4″ M29

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Magna-ported 4″ M29 .44 Magnum with an El Paso Saddlery Tanker holster and an M1 Carbine 15 round mag pouch which conveniently holds 4 speedloaders.

I have been a fan of .44 Magnum revolvers since I was a teenager. With that said, I’ve owned a number of them and of all the .44 Magnum revolvers I’ve owned, the 4″ M29, I’ve had for 17 years, is the most convenient one for size, weight and accuracy that I have found.  At 50 meters, this revolver will put all six rounds on a paper plate when using a solid rest.

My 4″ M29 is Magna-ported. What this means is that the perceived recoil and the muzzle rise is less than a non Magna-ported version and it makes a big difference. I consider Pachmayr grips to be a necessity on magnum caliber revolvers, and the “Gripper” model you see here is best, out of their selection of designs, in my opinion.

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The 3 loads I use out of my M29 are the Remington 240 grain HTP Jacketed soft point, the CCI shot loads for small game (both #9 and #4 shot) and a reload that pushes a 310 grain hardcast flatpoint at 1080 fps for a little over 800 ft lbs. of energy. This round is meant as a dangerous game load and is all about penetration of vital areas.

The 4″ M29 weighs in at 3.25 lbs. loaded and carries very well whether it’s strong side or cross draw on the belt, or in the tanker holster on my chest. Anything bigger is too cumbersome. Anything smaller would be painful to shoot, not as controllable and not as reliable, power wise, at taking out a dangerous animal.

This concludes the 4 Part series of the basic attributes I look for in “Firearms for Freedom and Forage”. Next, we will look more in depth into the firearms we’ve given a brief overview of.

JCD

“Parata Vivere”- Live Prepared.

 

 

XD-S, A FIST FULL OF HARDBALL

XD-S, A FIST FULL OF HARDBALL

Here’s a post I originally wrote for Springfield Armory’s “Armory Life” blog.

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Ever since I was a kid, I’ve been fascinated with small pistols. Whether it was a .45 caliber cap and ball “Philadelphia Derringer,” a two-shot cartridge firing over/under Remington .41 caliber rimfire, or a semi auto AMT Backup in .45ACP. I’ve always thought compact guns, whether pistol or rifle, were practical firearms to own. As long as you stay within the practical and realistic expectations placed on the chosen firearm, you are good to go.

I’ve owned an AMT Backup .45 for about 20 years. I owned a Star Firestar in 9mm for years before that, and I still have a Keltec PF-9, 9mm. These days my Springfield Armory XD-S 45 (the original) is my go to. I have found my XD-S 45 to be accurate, very compact, and easy to control.

Springfield Armory Inc. recently sent me a “Mod.2” XD-S 45 to try out and I must say, all the improvements that were made were favorable. Let’s discuss some of those improvements.

The Grip

The first and most visibly noticeable modification / improvement is the grip texturing. Although I have no problem with the texture of the original XD-S I already own, I like the smoother and more refined Mod.2 grip texture better than the original. Along with the grip texture, is the extended beavertail above the web of the firing hand which, incidentally, places your grip higher in relation to the bore’s axis, and thus improves control of the pistol.

The Sights

The XD-S Mod.2 is now available with a “Pro-Glo” tritium front sight from Ameriglo. Although I like the fiber optic on my original XD-S, a tritium front sight is a great option to have on a factory pistol. Couple this with the “One-handed, Rackable” steel rear sight (a squared off shelf meant to catch on a belt or other hard edged surface), it is a great improvement over the original.

Shooting Impressions

I will say that, for me, the Mod.2 shot and performed no better than my original XD-S (which does really well). At 10 meters the photo shows my typical grouping when I’m “takin’ my time in a hurry” with both my original and the newer Mod.2 XD-S 45. The difference in the lower bore position is slightly noticeable, but regardless, I do like the slightly extended beavertail grip. Also, the bright yellow outline of the tritium front sight stands out in all but the brightest shooting light.

Comparing either original or Mod.2 XD-S 45’s to my old AMT Backup 45 is pointless. The AMT was the “Compact .45ACP” of its day, but performance wise it is left in the dust by either the original or Mod.2 Springfield Armory XD-S 45.

Accessories

Hard worn original XD-S with shoulder holster

I have always been a fan of shoulder holsters and I’ve been using them for over 30 years. When it came time to get a holster for my XD-S 45, I went with the Galco Classic Lite system which I have used for a number of other compact pistols. I believe it’s one of the best shoulder rigs around for concealment of a subcompact pistol.

XD-S Mod.2 top left, XD-S original top right, AMT Backup bottom for reference

Another accessory that is a “no brainer” for an automatic pistol is extra magazines. Although the XD-S 45 comes with a five and a six round mag, I not only purchased extra five and six rounders, I purchased some SA seven rounders as well. They come with a sleeve for both the original and the Mod.2 pistol grip and both the six and seven rounders will fit in the offside mag pouch of the Galco shoulder rig.

The Ammo

The “food” you feed your defensive firearm is critical to its performance and lethality. Although one of the reasons I like the .45ACP is that it’s already almost a half -inch in diameter, it doesn’t hurt to give yourself every edge. The performance of the Federal Hydra-shok  has been proven to be phenomenal for self -defense in a wide range of calibers (210 gr .45ACP here), so there’s not much to say other than it is one of the more accurate loads out of both the XD-S 45 original and Mod.2.

The 205 grain “Syntech Defense” and the 230 grain “Syntech” ball ammo from Federal both performed well and give some shooters more options when using their pistol on the range. Just like the original XD-S and Mod.2, I would carry the 205gr. Syntech and the 210gr. Hydra-shok for defense without reservation.

Conclusions

Springfield Armory continues to improve their lineup. Whether it’s improving what they already have in production, or adding new types and models of firearms, they continue a manufacturing standard by which the industry is compared to.

JCD

“Parata Vivere” – Live Prepared