The Bergmann Scenario

My friend Bergmann made these two videos this past year, and if your primary plan is a “Bugout”, you might want to watch these and understand what you might be getting yourself into. As I’ve said in other posts, you will very rarely if ever make your primary plan a Bugout”. Bergmann has his reasons, and we’ve talked about them at length in many of the conversations we’ve had, and I think for his situation, he is using sound logic.

Note: Bergmann plans on a continuation of this video series, and when they are put up, they will be posted here.

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

A Realistic Bug Out

Since there are a few out there just now giving their impressions of whether you should or should not “Bugout”, I figured I’d post some oldies but goodies.

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2 January, 2017

Bergmann Rock

Most who know me, know that I am staunchly against most people planning to just “Bug Out” to the mountains when the SHTF. I advise people to plan on “Bugging In” where they are, or “Bugging To” a pre-planned location. The are a number of reasons why I’m against a “Bug Out”, but chief among them is that most who plan to do this are doing it out of laziness and/or an overwhelming lack of reality.

Laziness, because it is a lot easier to plan to just throw the pack on and grab the rifle, than it is to prepare to stay put, stock up on supplies, and plan a realistic defense. It would be great if it was that easy (and cheap), but it is not. After approximately two weeks, you will go from being a “Survivalist”, to being a “refugee”.

I say “lack of reality”, because most who plan to “bug out” haven’t even carried a pack any distance, let alone carried the weight of gear and food necessary to sustain ones self for any length of time. As I said above, not planning correctly will abruptly shove the “would be Survivalist” into the “refugee” category relatively quickly.

If you’re gonna “Bug Out” to the mountains, the plan my friend Bergmann has is the way to do it. It’s not a perfect plan, but then again what is? For his situation and location, he has come up with the most realistic plan he can, and is putting effort into preparing for it for years. Watch and learn.

If you have the opportunity, go check out his blog, you’ll more than likely learn something.

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JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

Preconceived Notions: “The Bugout”

Since there are a few out there just now giving their impressions of whether you should or should not “Bugout”, I figured I’d post some oldies but goodies.

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3 October, 2015

When I was new to Survivalism, I believed that “The Bugout” was the only way to go. I have had a backpack ready to go since I was twelve, and the only things that have really changed were techniques of how I’d “Bugout”, and where “Bugout”it stands in the order of precedence. I use P.A.C.E. planning in all activities related to survival. It was something I was taught when I first went into the military, and continue to this day. “P” is primary, “A” is alternate, “C” is contingency, “E” is emergent or emergency.

Bergmann Rock

Through the years, my thought on “Bugout” have evolved, simply because it makes sense to not put yourself into that type of situational risk unless all other options are denied to you. Keep in mind, a “Bugout” is not the same as a “Bug to”. A “Bugout” is when you’re headed out of your primary home with no clear home/retreat to go to. Most say “We’ll set up in the national/state forest.” These types generally have never “Set up” for an extended period (most not longer than a week, some maybe two weeks of camping at most, but it’s all good training). A “Bug To” is when you are headed to a clearly defined home or retreat that has been planned out (if someone lives there, they know you’re coming) and prepared by you ahead of time, and has supplies already laid in for your stay because it was part of the “plan”. Although “Bugout” and “Bug To” are primary residence evacuations, one (Bugout) is way too open ended to not be the last option available to you.

Let’s talk about “Bugout”, and why it should be the “E” in PACE planning. First off, how is the “Bugout” going to take place? In other words, what event will trigger your “Bugout”? Are you leaving on foot? Are you leaving by vehicle, and what is the load capacity of the vehicle (impending “Survival Vehicle” post coming up) . Are you taking a trailer? Do you have more than one vehicle (Convoy op)? Do you have a fixed location, even if it’s an area in the state forest you’ve reconned prior? How many routes have you created to get there, since one is most assuredly closed? Have you acquired detailed maps of the area? Do you already have a cache of supplies hidden there? We’ll cover some of these in order.

Bergmann Shelter

What will trigger your “Bugout”? House to house searches by fedgoons in your town? If you wait that long, you’ll definitely need to go by foot, because vehicle traffic will be stopped through the “Cordon and Search” process. A plant accident or natural disaster (Katrina) with poisonous chemicals or severe weather headed your way? Well that’s a “no brainer” vehicle “Bugout” if there ever was one, but I’m fairly certain you won’t be headed to a state forest, right? Is it from a man made incident like what happened in Baltimoredore this year? Once again, even though leaving on foot might have to happen if it went off the charts insane (B-More was nothing compared to what’s coming when the EBT’s go down), but more than likely it’s a vehicle escape, and you’ll be headed to another home for temporary housing (an acquaintance had to do that with his mother during that incident, that was her CVS that burned down).

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I doubt you will perform a “Bugout” for an economic disaster situation. What good would that do to go to the forest because the economy collapsed. One scenario that sticks in my mind, especially due to my NBC (nuclear Biological Chemical) military background is a pandemic. Of course timing in this (like many other evacs) is crucial. Better a day early than a minute too late.  They will drop the hammer of blockade hard when they decide to do it (a good example is the movie “The Crazies”).

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If you’re planning a “Bugout” after a nuke strike, you might want to do more research. If you’re still alive, but in a dangerous area (high radiation on site or in the path of impending fallout which usually goes downwind of the target, but winds aloft are tricky), you probably should shelter in place (hopefully you have a basement), because exposure outside will kill you quickly if caught in the fallout. This is one time when a “Bugout” would be a good option, considering living in the forest for a couple weeks away from the radiation zone would definitely be the optimal choice.  OK, so we’ve talked about what will set the “Bugout” plan in motion, now to the “means” of “Bugout”.

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Are you planning to “Bugout” on foot? Did you read the account of the couple that was ambushed in “Patriots, Survive the Coming Collapse”? Although they were “Bugging To” a retreat, it was across the country (Chicago to Idaho), and took them forever because they lost their vehicles in the city. How much food can you effectively carry with your other supplies in your rucksack? I’ve found two weeks is about it, and that makes for a heavy ruck. Have you tried carrying your ruck with the actual load you’ve placed in it? You know, the one sitting in the corner of your spare room? What happens after the food runs out? Although you can extend what you’ve got with you by using game carts, you still will run out of the expendable items rather quickly. Wait, don’t tell me….you’re gonna live off the land, right? I know very few that could do this in reality (military SERE prepares you to exist and/or do without till they can recover you), and two things to note about them. One, they would never plan it as anything but a “last ditch” option. Two, they would tell you it would be existing, not living.

Jeremiah Johnson with a kill

 

Jeremiah Johnson's Friend

Wanna live like Jeremiah Johnson (watchin’ it right now to get me in the proper mindset)? If you’ll take note, first, he was assisted by Chris Laughty (I believe that is the spelling), and probably would have died like so many others that went to be “Mountain Men” if it hadn’t been for his help. Are you gonna go to “Rendezvous” each spring and pick up the hundred pounds or so of supplies with your pack animals? Tell you what, ask my friend Bergmann what he thinks of that kind of never ending existence. On another note concerning the food and supplies thing. Do you have small (unable to carry their own supplies) children? Guess what? you just effectively halved your total “Per Individual” food carrying capacity.

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Are you “Bugging out” by vehicle? It’s definitely the better option, but still, if you you are headed to a remote undeveloped location with no other supplies on site. You’ll get by longer, but you had better figure how to extend what you have for a long period. The good thing about a vehicle, especially if it’s of decent size, is it’s ability to carry you, at least three of your loved ones, all your personal “Bugout” gear, and some extras (a 12×12 tent with woodstove comes to mind. Oh wait, that’s right, I forgot you’re “Bugging Out” during the summer, right?). What’s the range of a tank of gas in your “Survival Vehicle”? Do you have extra fuel ( I keep enough spare TREATED gas cans for one extra tankful)?

Are you using a trailer? If so, this needs to contain the “nice to have” survival supplies, but not the absolute, survival “Have to’s”, because you need to be able to ditch it in an emergency. What’s the trailer do to your vehicle’s fuel economy when you have the survival gear loaded up? Don’t know? How can you say “I have a plan” without knowing basic info about your “Survival Conveyance”, whether it’s your feet (how far, how fast, how much weight) or your vehicle (distance, capacity of personnel and equipment, etc)? A big downside to a vehicle is being required to at least stay of passable trails, and more than likely semi improved roads. Oh, I forgot, you have a Monster that will eat up cross country and make it’s own trail, right? The upside is that it makes a “Bug out” more palatable as an option when you do the math, as compared to “bugging out” on foot.

Might a “Bugout” be necessary? Yes. Should you plan on it being anything but the last ditch option? No. The figures just don’t add up to success and long term survival. When it comes to PACE for me, I organize this way. PRIMARY: “Bug In” at my home with all the supplies I’ve prepared over the years. ALTERNATE: “Bug To”, and am headed to a property that has prepositioned supplies and family, and I’m taking my vehicle and trailer. CONTINGENCY: Longer route “Bug To” same as above, but to property of friends, and using two vehicles (convoy op) for security. EXIGENT/EMERGENCY 1: “Bug Out” to a secure, private, semi improved property site with vehicle. EXIGENT/EMERGENCY 2: “Bugout” on foot to a State forest within 10 miles of home (some prepositioned supplies, with an alternate another 5 miles away.

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I read a lot of Ragnar Benson’s (among others) stuff when I was a kid. Some of it was BS, and some had some real pearls of wisdom in it. One of the most important things I ever gleaned from his writing is something to keep in mind when planning any of your options. NEVER BECOME A REFUGEE! In most instances ( a few are not) primarily planning to “Bugout” without weighing and prioritizing other options first is planning to be a refugee, whether you like it or not. Read some of what Selco has to say, or better yet, look at the refugees walking across Europe and tell me that is something you consider as a viable option if others are available.

What’s the bottom line? If you have no options to “Bug To” after your “Bug In” option is expended, by all means plan a “Bugout”. Hopefully it will be with a vehicle, but if not, go to my buddy Bergmann’s site (you have to sign up, but it’s free) and get some advice on planning and prepositioning for the eventual “Bugout” operation  implementation. Prior Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance (7P’s), right? Being a Survivalist has been a rewarding, but at times daunting, task throughout my life from a youngster till now. In the end though, it’s more about those we care about than what it does for us that’s important. That’s why realistic assessments of the facts, not fantasy, is crucial to your survival.

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JCD

American by BIRTH Infidel by CHOICE

I’m Up, He Sees Me, I’m Down!

 

mdt-patches1-1I decided to re-post this here after getting some inquiries about why I like this type of range over a square range. The A-BC Drill is conducted in every RBTEC class, and gives the students a firm grasp of the reality concerning the real world application of movement during fire over uneven terrain.

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28 April, 2014

 

Had a good class weekend (being in the woods training is always a good weekend). I’m posting a video that was taken to show the basics of the rush, as an individual skill to practice. The Mason Dixon Tactical drill being performed here, is the A/BC-Drill (Assault/ Break Contact).  I have students perform this, first on dry runs, then (after assurance that they are safe), the live fire. Spacing between the buddy team is about 20 to 25 meters across. This spacing is for 1) Safety, and 2) If you can do it this far apart and be heard by your buddy, closer will be a walk in the park.

As I’ve told students that think just one class is all that’s needed. Every time you take the class (or practice these skills in a safe place) you pick up things you didn’t pick up before. When you start out, you are so intent on the basics of remembering “Muzzle, Trigger, Safety!” (Live fire is SERIOUS BUSINESS!) , that you forget some of the basics like your  initial warning of  “Distance, Direction, Description”, and reminding yourself of “I’m up, He sees me, I’m down”.

As your confidence in your ability to “Do it right” goes up, so does your comfort level, and  attention to details. Assessing where your next position is going to be, is one of those tasks that most students forget initially. As they practice the drill, and they continue to perfect the implied tasks by order of priority (safety is THE PRIORITY whether on my range or in combat, unless your foolish enough to think safety rules don’t apply there), their ability and proficiency goes up.

A square range with set cover positions is not real world for the most part, and anyone who hasn’t trained on a true “real world” range, is deluding themselves about their ability to perform a buddy team bounding exercise outside the sterile square range environment. “I’m up, He sees me, I’m down” isn’t about how super fast you are (your buddy is covering you…right?) it’s a guide mantra that is going through your mind as you perform the task (the rush),  and it becomes second nature with a lot of repetition.

Once you get to the point that it is a part of your natural thought pattern when conducting the rush, you will notice your personal “GET THE HELL DOWN” alarm will go off when your up too long. “Slow is smooth, smooth is fast” right? Although we want to get from A to B as quickly as possible, there are threats other than bullets. Picking your route to cover isn’t as easy as picking your cover will be, and your need to move as fast as you can to that cover, while still watching your step (a broken ankle or knee in training or real world could very well end the situation very quickly, and not in your favor). A square range does not accurately simulate this threat, and that’s one of the reasons I don’t use one.

Perfect practice makes perfect. Start slow, do it by the numbers. Speed will come, but you don’t want to injure yourself, and set back your training cycle from that injury. I believe time is short, get trained while you can. Be a retaining wall to the jackbooted thugs that want to destroy what we love, not a speed bump. Which are you?

Here’s the deal with the video. It started about 5 seconds late, so my initial 8 round rapid fire burst, and my giving “Distance, Direction, and Description were not part of the video. I’m carrying my 15 lb, Socom M1A EBR (too heavy, right?), and my gear is the H harness and Tac Tailor vest from this post and it weighs in at 70 lbs. (this is what I train in, as that is as heavy as an LBE will ever be for me) And yes, my 6’1”, 195 lbs frame looks like a fat ass in the video (add 10 lbs. my ass), It wasn’t done as  a “look at me” and how cool I am doing IMT, it was done because I’ve had a number of people ask about the specifics of the A/BC-Drill we do.

On a side note, After seeing some of the comments on the April 29 re-post over at WRSA, one thing needs addressed and that’s “volume of fire”. We are not sustained by a gov logistics train, so the volume of fire you put out as a civilian defender needs to be regulated by how much ammo you have (no resupply from a chopper or vehicle), and the rate of fire you can accurately hit the target (whether individual or the cover/concealment the individual is hiding behind).

The rate of fire in the video is approximately one round every two seconds. This falls between the “sustained” (12-15 rpm) and “semi automatic” (40-45 rpm) rates of fire for an AR-15 or M1A (what both participants in the video are using) rifle. This is also the rate of fire which most competent riflemen can ACCURATELY hit a target they’re shooting at within 200 meters. We have no belt-fed machine guns to fire at a “sustained” (100 rpm), “rapid” (200 rpm) or “cyclic” (650-950 rpm) rate with the ability to change the barrel when needed, and we definitely don’t have the logistic support for them. Accurately hitting your target as opposed to “Spray and Pray” is what is called for.

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

Commentary On A Good Southern Prepper 1 Video About Training

I watched a video this morning from southernprepper1 that was pretty much what I’ve been telling students for years. Unless you have some serious, and long term training, you are not going to be doing any offensive operations from your base of operations, retreat/domicile. What will you be facing for the most part? Will it just be inexperienced looters and thugs? Will the experienced looters and thugs have experienced Infantry vets? Will the threat be experienced gov contractors or even the military? Obviously, we won’t know, but we can make some assumptions, based on what scenario (economic collapse, civil war, or limited nuclear exchange) takes place.

Inexperienced looters and thugs will be a problem, but most of them are all about the quick score (both now and after SHTF), and not “making a point” (continuing with the “raid”) when they hit resistance. When it comes to looters and thugs bent on raiding (home invasion) a dwelling, either before or after SHTF, their primary concern is the initial response of the home owner (security measures or armed personnel), and the response of outside support (whether that’s the police now, or a Neighborhood Protection Team after SHTF).

Inexperienced looters and thugs are easily stopped by layered security measures like security lighting, security cameras, locked chain link fence, heavy duty door and door frame, shrubs under all the ground level, first floor windows that make window breaches with a buddy or short ladder more difficult, loud, audibly piercing alarm, etc., but the experienced version of the looters and thugs have planned ahead and done their “Leaders Recon” before hitting a place.

An experienced group will know if they need bolt cutters, a door ram, and/or shotgun for a breach. An experienced group will know if you have security cameras, and will have ways of defeating it from a concealed location (accurate air rifle or suppressed .22LR) An experienced group will have a assault plan and special teams for different tasks. An experienced group will know how many exits there are to the dwelling, and either hit all at once, or at least have them covered once the assault kicks off.

Something to keep in mind when discussing this stuff (the defense), is that the defense is a Hell of a lot easier than offense (usually they are fixed positions and not much is required physically), and it requires a lower ratio of personnel (defense is usually a 3 to 1 ratio meaning the defense only needs one person for every three offensive/attacking personnel) than the offense usually does. Generally speaking, preppers and Survivalists need to make sure they have their defensive plan ready and able to be carried out (enough personnel just for that) before planning on conducting any form of offensive actions.

I’m not gonna bother covering what happens if you got hit by contractors or military, because if you do, you had better already have a squared away escape plan in place because it would be the “Experienced looters and thugs” on steroids (MG’s, AT-4’s, breaching charges that make their own doorway, etc.). You do what you can to fight something like that, but have no illusion that the probability leans towards getting rolled over, even though the possibility is that you could still win. This is why having someone who knows how to set up security of your site is so important. A knowledgeable individual (Like southernprepper1 said, not someone who read it in a book) can give you the layered security set up that gives you advanced warning and also helps channel attackers, and restrict a site breach for a short while.

Southernprepper1 mentioned needing to be in shape for patrolling, and having experience and solid training. This applies across the board, whether it’s a local “Presence Patrol” (defensive measure designed to keep track of what’s going on in your area), or a “Combat Patrol” (offensive patrol designed to look for trouble and proactively mitigate it before it becomes an “in your face” threat to your area or group.

When you are a patrol member, your physical fitness is not just about you. If your lazy out of shape ass gets shot and killed because you couldn’t put down the three times a day “Double frufru latte with extra caramel and whipped cream”, and never did an exercise that didn’t involve 12 ounce Bud Light curls, that’s on you, right? Here’s the other side of that situation. OK, you’re a lazy ass, but want to get in on the “Cool stuff” like patrols, right?

How many of your buddies (I’d imagine you are all close if you are spending the apocalypse with them) will try to extract you (either out of the direct fire that dropped you to begin with, or out of the area of the fight via casualty evac) and get killed in the process because your fat ass slowed them down long enough to get wacked by the original ambushers? How many guys that are in shape, but got hit and needed extracting will get killed because your lazy ass can’t even move them out of the line of fire, let alone out of the area of the fight?

Presence patrols are a necessity after SHTF, even if it’s just a patrol that doesn’t go out of sight of your retreat. Am I saying do it even if you’re not in shape or a physically capable of performing it effectively? Nope, not at all. Getting ambushed within sight of your retreat still has the same issues, the only difference might be the amount of support fire you might be able to get from the retreat personnel (standing guard posts) while you are trying to get out of the kill zone. What I’m saying is that you are going to be lacking in an effective layer of your defense (one of the outer rings) if you cannot perform that function. Your call, but this goes back to the question of “Are you just playing at it, or are you serious?”.

For the most part, prepper or Survivalist groups conducting “Combat Patrols” is ridiculous. You should always be defensive in nature (you are not an infantryman without infantry, no matter how you appear, even if you were an Infantryman), and unless you are performing an operation to get someone of your group back from a group who took them as a hostage, you are asking for trouble. Even performing a hostage rescue is almost an exercise in futility unless you have some really squared away experienced (know how to plan and conduct the op) former Infantry type soldiers.

A while back, I wrote a post about Battle Drill 4 (this BD is for up to a platoon sized element, but as a civilian trainer, I have only taught it at the Squad/ 9-12 personnel or Heavy Squad/up to 18 personnel level) called “React To Ambush, “A WAY”, Not “THE WAY”. In it, I mentioned this, a 6 man recon team will probably do things a little different than a 9 man LI squad”. How would they do this, and why? A 4 man fire team or a 6 man reconnaissance team (LRS) will usually react to contact (in this case a “near ambush”) in a defensive way (break contact) whereas a 9 man Light Infantry Squad or 12 man ODA can use an offensive technique (attack the attackers) to mitigate their perilous “near ambush” position and destroy the ambushers in place through audacity and maneuver.

This technique (near ambush response) is difficult for a well trained, experienced military infantry squad to perform, let alone some “Fly by night” militia or Survivalist group to undertake. Although I teach Battle Drills 1A (squad attack) and Battle Drill 4 (react to ambush) in class 2 of the “Bushbastard” (RSF-SUTATS) course, I also present the caveat that breaking contact is the default for any enemy contact, and offensive operations are generally a “no-no” for any civilian group, simply due to a lack of competence, experience, and confidence.

Southernprepper1 talked about “No tactics are better than bad tactics”, and for the most part I agree. I also believe that people that are trying to figure something out by getting training, even if it’s wrong, will probably do better than the group who never tried to even get training. The untrained group will have a response based on “fight or flight”, not a plan, and their survival will be dumb luck. A bad plan (plans don’t usually survive contact, intact anyway) is better than dumb luck, and “No”, this is not the same as the “I’d rather have luck over skill any day.” line.

I have seen some pretty ridiculous training, done by people who have read a book and think they know what they’re talking about due to that info. Hell, I’ve had guys who received their “Bushbastard” tab tell me they want to start qualifying others for the tab, and I told them “Not just NO, but HELL NO!”, until they qualified for their “Bushmaster” tab. “The “Bushmaster” course is a five class course that teaches “Wilderness survival”, “Land Nav”, “Combat Leadership”, and “Train the Trainer”, and has a final weekend that tests all the applicable skills learned from “Bushbastard” and “Bushmaster”. The “Bushmaster” course is not even listed on the website because the only people who can take it are graduates of the “Bushbastard” course and I don’t want inquiries about it if you don’t qualify.

Regardless of what someone who has taken classes from another professional trainer or I can teach you, I have given people plenty of advice on how to find a competent trainer, even if you’re not going the “Professional Trainer” route. Look for a guy who is a prior service Non Commissioned Officer or Commissioned Officer of the Infantry (Airborne, LRS, Rangers and Special Forces are all different tier levels of Infantry).

If you think they are BSing you (there are a lot of them out there), ask to see their DD-214 and look at block 1 for their name (make sure it’s them), block 4a for their rank, and block 11 for their primary and secondary MOS’s (the infantry military occupational specialty is 11 series, and although SF used to be 11 series, it is now 18 series) and if they say they have combat experience as an infantryman, it will show up as a “Combat Infantry Badge” in block 13 (one caveat is if a guy was a Special Forces member in the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, there’s a good chance he might not have a CIB even if he was in combat, due to the nature of their job and where they were doing it).

If the aforementioned guy who wanted to train you (especially if it’s for money) is saying he’s an experienced infantryman but responds with, “My DD-214 is none of your business.”, tell him to take a hike. He’s the one that says he can train you because he’s experienced, right? Make him show you he’s experienced. As to the professional trainers out there, I can’t speak for them, but I am more than willing to show my DD-214 (or any of my other applicable training certifications) to a student at a class that has doubts as to my credentials (just don’t be a dumbass and ask me to send it to you in an emails like some have done).

Be realistic when you are planning for SHTF. If you are like a few Vet friends of mine (they call themselves “mobility kills”. You’ll get it if you’re a former grunt LOL), you know you can no longer (or never could if you’re round) function as a patrol member, due to your lack of physical fitness shape (for this exercise, “round” is a shape, but not the shape we’re looking for) or physical condition (you’re physically broke). Either plan on having a defensive perimeter that is well thought out, multi layered and has serious defensive potential and always with a secured escape route, or plan on finding others who can perform the presence patrol function to become part of your group whether in your actual dwelling/retreat, or in your Neighborhood Protection Area.

Unless your patrol group is prior service infantry, you are not going to be able to function as the “Infantrymen of the 7-8”, no matter what some trainer tells you (no trainer has the time to teach the whole 7-8 in their classes, no matter how many weekends you attend, and as southernprepper1 said, you need to know more than a chapter from this one book to be effective as an Infantryman during Infantry operations). Applying the standards of CTT that I spoke about in this post is definitely within the realm of possibility for the average civilian (because everybody in the Army has to do it, whether support or not) that applies themselves to the training, and gets in shape.

I’ve said many times, “Be a Survivalist who is a “Jack of all Trades”, master of some (preferably the life saving and life protecting arts).”. We are not Infantry, and if you desire to be, don’t go to a Damned tactical course, go join the Army or the Marines. Survivalists glean the needed skills from many areas to better their chances of survival in the non permissive world we envision our neighborhood becoming.

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A game cart loaded with a ruck for a long walk evacuation

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Survivalists really don’t want to conduct a Bug Out on foot with a metric ton of crap on our backs or even on a game cart but we’d do it because we know we will never be coming back to our home. Hell, we don’t even want to have to walk around the farm with a basic compliment of a couple rifle mags, a pistol and a knife on a battle belt. What we know is that the lines between “what we want”, and “what is getting more and more likely to occur” are getting further and further away from intersecting, and it would be foolish to not face that reality.

Lightweight Gear Post5

Basic lightweight kit mentioned in this post. Pistol, pistol mags, three mag bandoleer and a full size fixed blade knife.

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Another variation of the “Around the farm” rig that you can use. The one above this is more streamlined and less intrusive for doing chores than this one is, but this one has six rifle mags included instead of three.

Here’s the parting thought. When you are looking for a trainer, ask yourself, does this guy try to convince you that he will make me a grunt, or does he want to make me a Survivalist. A grunt plans for the day or the week, a Survivalist plans for the month or the year. Planning beyond that timeline is an exercise in operational (but not logistical) futility, considering the variables that could exist. That doesn’t mean don’t stock up on food, first aid supplies, bullets, etc., it means if you do, you should disperse them, but that is a topic for another post.

MDT Class 16-3-2-2

Being able to live like this is necessary, but it is also worse case scenario, and hopefully you will be able to get by with the earlier lightweight kit options most of the time.

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE