Purpose Driven SHTF Planning

So what are you planning for? Are you planning to “bugout” to the hills at the first sign of societal trouble? Are you planning to stand fast, and defend hearth and home against the entitlement zombie hordes? Are you planning to thwart the evil empire’s designs on your community, as a member of the militia? Are you basing your preps on some fiction or non fiction book you read that gave you an idea for what might happen? There are plenty of scenarios out there, some plausible, some, not so much, but the important things are these. 1) Do you have general. realistic preps in place. 2) Do you have a solid, well thought out and realistic plan to deal with the general and specific concerns you’ve identified. 3) Are you physically and/or logistically equipped and able to carry out the planned responses to these threats. We’ll talk about these three things in order.

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1). Do you have general, realistic preps in place? Obviously, it doesn’t do any good to be armed to the teeth, if you don’t have plenty of food and other goods stored away. As I’ve told plenty of people in the past. If you know someone whose only preps are weapons and ammo, STAY THE HELL AWAY FROM THEM!, and for God’s sake, don’t tell them about your preps. Where do you think they’ll come first?  General preps would be items that would be stored specifically for use in any emergency, whether it’s a localized natural disaster, or WW3. Storable food, first aid supplies, shelter (environmental and defense) building material, firearms and other weapons and tools for defense/hunting chores, etc are just some of the general items you will need to cover a wide range of emergencies. By “realistic” I will use food as an example. Although we’d all love to have multiple years worth of MRE’s, or freeze dried food put back. The reality for most of us is this. Those types of meals are specialty items for specific instance like bugging out, or any other time weight and/or space is at a premium. Canned goods, whether they are done by you or bought at the store, are not only more economically viable, but in the case of the store bought canned goods, are more durably package, and the home canned items are healthier.

2) Do you have a solid, well thought out and realistic plan to deal with the general and specific concerns you’ve identified? What is your fear? The government becoming tyrannical, and making Matt Bracken’s “Enemies Foreign And Domestic” series come true? The same government destroying the economy and causing a depression like event which spirals into a“Patriots: Surivive the Coming Collapse” situation? How’s about the natural disaster scenario in “Lucifer’s Hammer” , or the nuclear war in “Alas Babylon” (2 personal favorites of mine)? No matter what the scenario, as long as you are being realistic (I know the last two election proved the existence of zombies, but the actual “Walking Dead” version is not realistic) as to the possibility of it happening, you need to make a plan for dealing with that eventuality, and your mindset is one of the most important things to assess and keep “real”, regarding how you prioritize the threats.

One of the reasons I’ve decided to teach a number of my courses from a Neighborhood Protection Team (NPT in A Failure Of Civility) standpoint is due to my belief that the approach to defending your community should be as a civilian member/defender of that community, not as a paramilitary squad rifleman (“tip of the spear” and all that). Mindset goes a long way in how you are viewed by those you protect. You want them to feel you are a competent, motivated peer, not a “Call of Duty” wannabe.

Communication, or the lack thereof, can make all the difference in your awareness of the developing situation, and how you can effectively deal with it during the event. Sparks31 does this kind of training in his “Grid Down Commo class”. Having redundancy in all your planning is a prerequisite for success (no where more than commo), and falls under the “well thought out” part of the “2” header above.

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Using the acronym PACE (Primary, Alternate, Contingency, Emergency), will help you prioritize your redundancy. For instance, using commo as an example Primary could be land line telephone or Skype, Alternate could be cell phone or a payphone (rare, I know), Contingency could be texting or social media (Facebook), and Emergency could be a Ham or CB radio,  or a “Dead Drop”. Plan redundancy into your preps, and even if you don’t need to resort to using them, you’ll have items available to help friends who might show up with nothing. An example of that would be this; You use an AR 15 as your “Go to” weapon. You have one other rifle of the same caliber, and magazine type (Keltec SU-16C fills a great lightweight, compact bugout/backup rifle niche), in case there’s a major problem with your primary, and you have a single shot NEF Handi Rifle in .223 as an extra. You can now arm two others with a rifle that uses the same ammo you have stockpiled for your rifle.

 3) Are you physically and/or logistically equipped and able to carry out the planned responses to these threats. I know, I know, a number of us constantly harp on the whole “PT” thing. Guess what, If you don’t do PT, or haven’t figured out a way to mitigate your inability to do it, it will be a noisy version of suicide for you and probably yours. Defending and sustaining (day in and day out hard physical labor in a non permissive environment) your life is a physically demanding event. First choice for those who can’t physically stand toe to toe with the bad guys, would be to figure out how to keep the “wolves” from knowing you exist (by being very well concealed, or having the ability to move out within a very short period of time), or by keeping them at distance. If you can do this, you might have a chance even if you’re not up to a demanding physical challenge due to age or an infirmity.

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There are ways around the “Leather shod mobility” (Rucking) requirements (we’re talking about this from a Survivalist “bugout” load perspective, not a “35 lb ruck and your load bearing gear” EIB/Infantry perspective). Although I plan on using “Shanks Mare under load” (and practice all the time), I have tested out other methods, so if the need is there, I can move even more supplies. Whether you have a plan to use ATV’s, horses, sleds, or game carts on a “Bugout”, you need to make sure it is logistically realistic (where will you get fuel for the ATV’s or horses, cache maybe?), and you are capable of the minimum performance standards needed to complete the task (can you even load and pull a sled, or game cart with your gear?).

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   This is not an “If you can’t PT you ain’t shit and will die post!  I completely understand that there are plenty out there that have the desire and intestinal fortitude to compete in the TEOTWAWKISTAN OLYMPICS, but as a good friend likes to say, “Hell, I’m already a mobility kill.”. My desire is to make you look at this from the realistic perspective of the Survivalist, (not some mental masturbatory “I wanna live “Call Of Duty- The Later Years’.” exercise), and help you develop a plan that will actually work FOR YOU!. I will not just placate you with pleasantries such as “If you have this insert name rifle (God’s own laser don’tcha know) you will stave off the entitlement horde for days.”.

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There are plenty of self evident solutions out there, you just have to do your research, and more importantly, test them out, to make sure they work FOR YOU. Don’t get me wrong here. PT is very important, but you do what you can do (you know if your bullshitting yourself or not), and plan to fill the physical preparedness gaps you’ve found with common sense solutions that don’t rely too heavily on unreliable technological advances. Be honest with yourself on what you face, and how you’ll face it.

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There are plenty of folks out there that will tell you that I have no problem spending hours on the phone giving suggestions to prep problems. I will not BS you with a “What you need is to attend this class I teach.” line. If I think it’s appropriate, and if you ask about them, I will tell you. I feel my responsibility is to help you figure out the best solution for you, and if that means recommending you take a course or buy gear from someone else, I will. The coming unpleasantness WILL discriminate! If you’ve planned, prepared, and trained ahead of time, your survival will not be just a “Dumb Luck” proposition, but a “Luck With Benefits” insurance policy.

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

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A Survivalist Self Assessment

MDT Patches1-1

I was recently going through an old journal I kept when I was a young Survivalist (15 years old), and I came across a self assessment test that I apparently thought was important enough to write out verbatim in 1985 (I decided to re-write it in a Word format now). I have copied what I had written in the journal here for your own perusal and use. It was originally put out by a company called “Safety City” of Washington D.C.. I tried to find out if they still existed, but all attempts at googling that business showed nothing available. Some people think that if it’s not the latest and greatest info (this is 32 years old), it is “obviously” sub par. Think what you will, but I challenge you to come up with a more exhaustive generalized skills and equipment checklist. Enjoy.

On the Warpath

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A: HOME MANAGEMENT/HANDICRAFTS

  1. Home Water Purification/Storage
  2. Food Processing/Canning/Dehydrating/Storage
  3. Hand Powered Home/Kitchen Appliances
  4. Nutrition/Home Economics
  5. Soaps/Candle Making
  6. Home Product Chemistry/Formulation Process
  7. Spinning/Weaving
  8. Sewing/Knitting/Crocheting
  9. Home Energy/Resource Conservation
  10. Other__________________________

 

B: HOME BACK-UP SYSTEMS 

  1. Back-Up Home heating Systems
  2. Back-Up Home Lighting Systems
  3. Back-Up Range/Cooking Systems
  4. Back-Up Home Water Heating/Pressure Systems
  5. Back-Up Food Refrigeration/Freezing Systems
  6. Back-Up Home Electrical Systems
  7. Back-Up Home Waste Disposal/Composting
  8. Back-Up Communication/Signaling Systems
  9. Other_______________________________

 

C: MEDICAL/DENTAL

  1. First Aid
  2. Non-Prescription Drugs/Medications
  3. Paramedical Skills
  4. Medicine/Surgery
  5. Pharmacology
  6. Nursing/Midwifery
  7. Medical Lab Technology
  8. Paradental Skills
  9. Dentistry/Oral Surgery
  10. Public Health/Epidemiology
  11. Medicinal Herbs/Plants
  12. Natural/Folk Medicine
  13. Other______________

 

D: FOOD PRODUCTION

  1. Gardening/Organic-Hydroponic
  2. Greenhouse Construction/Use
  3. Fruit Tree/Small Orchard Cultivation
  4. Beekeeping
  5. Small Animal Husbandry
  6. Aquaculture
  7. Farmstead Operation/Maintenance/Management
  8. Other______________

 

E: MECHANICS/BUILDING/FABRICATION/PROCESSING

  1. Hand Tools Use/Maintenance
  2. Wood Cutting Equipment/Skills
  3. Bicycle Maintenance/Repair
  4. Small Engine Maintenance/Repair
  5. Auto/Truck Maintenance/Repair
  6. Home Appliance Repair
  7. Home Electrical System Repair/Maintenance
  8. Plumbing
  9. Carpentry/Woodworking
  10. Masonry/Concrete
  11. Metalworking/Blacksmithing/Weld-Solder
  12. Wood/Coal Stove Design/Fabrication
  13. Rope/Cable/Rigging Skills
  14. Well Drilling/Pumping Systems
  15. Trailer/RV/Mobile Home/Design/Fabrication
  16. Construction/Cabins/Sheds/Domes/Field Expedient Structures
  17. Tanning/Leatherwork
  18. Shoemaking/Shoe Repair
  19. Other________________

 

F: ENERGY SYSTEMS

  1. Wood/Coal Energy Systems
  2. Solar Energy-Passive/Active Systems/Photovotaics
  3. Wind Energy/Voltaics
  4. Alcohol Fuel Production
  5. Liquid Propane Energy Systems
  6. Steam Power Systems
  7. Water Power Systems/Hydraulics
  8. Pedal Power Systems
  9. Other_________________

 

G: OUTDOOR LIVING/PIONEERING

  1. Backpacking/Camping Skills
  2. Foraging/Wilderness Survival
  3. Hunting Skills
  4. Fishing Skills
  5. Skiing/Mountaineering
  6. Swimming/Lifesaving
  7. Canoeing/Kayaking
  8. Open Water/Deep Sea Survival
  9. Search/Rescue Procedures
  10. Other__________________

 

H: SECURITY/SELF-/HOME-DEFENSE SKILLS

  1. Home Security/Defense Systems
  2. Individual/Small-Group Defensive Tactics
  3. Personal Protection/Combat Skills
  4. Rifle Skills
  5. Pistol/Revolver Skills
  6. Shotgun Skills
  7. Non-Lethal Weapons/Defensive Skills
  8. Scouting/Patrol Skills
  9. Improvised Fortification Systems
  10. Lethal Weapons/Firearms Safety/Discipline/Responsibility
  11. Firearms Marksmanship
  12. Ammunition/Handloading
  13. Gunsmithing/Firearms Repair
  14. Blackpowder Firearms Skills
  15. Crossbow/Tomahawk/Blowgun Skills
  16. Edged Weapon Skills/Knife Fighting
  17. Other_________________________

 

I: EVACUATION, MOBILE SURVIVAL/RETREAT SYSTEMS

  1. Backpack Systems
  2. Bicycle Systems
  3. Motorcycle Systems
  4. Canoe/Small Boat Systems
  5. Automobile/Truck Systems
  6. Four Wheel Drive Vehicle Systems
  7. Recreational Vehicle/Trailer Systems
  8. Sail/Powerboat Systems
  9. Aircraft Systems
  10. Individual/Family Retreat Planning/Design
  11. Group/Organization Retreat Planning/Design
  12. Other_______________________________

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE:

There are four sections that you can complete for each topic within each category. “Interest Level”, the “Present Skill Level”, a “Desired Skill Level”, and finally the “Willing To Develop/Provide Training For Others” section.

Section One would be your “INTEREST LEVEL”.

Under “Interest Level” is three categories, “NONE”, “SOME”, and “HIGH”. These are self explanatory.

Section Two would be your “PRESENT SKILL LEVEL”. 

The four levels of skill are, “NONE”, “APPRENTICE”, “JOURNEYMAN”, and “MASTER”. Be honest with yourself, it is a self assessment. You will never get better if you aren’t honest with yourself about where you are presently at.

Section Three is “DESIRED SKILL LEVEL”.

If you indicated in the “Interest Level” section that your interest was high in a given area, fill out your “Desired Skill Level” for those areas. Those levels would be “APPRENTICE’, “JOURNEYMAN” and “MASTER”. This will give you something to strive for.

Last but not least is Section Four which is “WILLING TO DEVELOP/PROVIDE TRAINING FOR OTHERS” and consists of whether you are willing to teach any area that you have a “Master’s” level of skill in. This is just a simple “YES” or “NO”.

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Two things I added to my list years ago in the “Other” sections of two of the categories were as follows: in Category “G” I included Trapping, because if you are going to include “Hunting” and “Fishing’ as their own categories, “Trapping” deserves it’s own too. I also added ATV Systems to Category “I”, because they are not an automobile, and they have many more “Survivalist” oriented capabilities than a motorcycle.

Sometimes it is very hard to get an idea of what you need to learn or invest in, where you are at with skills and equipment, and where you want to be regarding skills and gear. Hopefully, this assessment will help you figure out some of those needs.

MDT Class 16-3-1-1

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

A Survivalist’s Perspective And Use Of Common Task Testing As It Is Applied To the Infantry, And It’s Support.

Common Tasks Testing, The Army’s “Everybody” Requirement

From the desk of JC Dodge

While Speaking with Concerned American from WRSA the other night, he asked me about the validity of putting out a checklist of skills that originate in the “Common Tasks/Skill Level 1” (now called “Warrior Skills Level 1”) manual that the US Army uses. After thinking about it, I decided to go through the PDF Table of Contents, and highlight what I thought were important skills for the Survivalist/ NPT Member to concentrate on. For the last two years, I have concentrated most of my class time on the Rural Buddy Team Essentials Course (RBTEC), because the Buddy Team is not only the core building block of any martial group (Techniques of movement, etc. are usually the same, just on a larger scale with the bigger groups), but is also what I believe is the most realistic, when it comes to how many people you will have to work with (apparently, some other trainers are now seeing the reality of that, and are jumping on that bandwagon).

So here goes. The skills I believe you should concentrate on are highlighted in yellow, and I will make notes below or in the screenshot where I feel it is appropriate (they will be in black after the task listing, or in red if it needs explanation). Keep in mind, that if you know someone that served in the US Army, they had to test on this every year in their respective units. This isn’t just an “Infantry?Combat Arms” thing.

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Here’s the link again if you missed it above  http://www.milsci.ucsb.edu/sites/secure.lsit.ucsb.edu.mili.d7/files/sitefiles/resources/STP%2021-1-SMCT,%20Warrior%20Skills,%20Level%201.pdf

Most of these are the basic tasks a member of the US Army has to perform to pass Common Tasks Testing every year. Infantry personnel have to perform the CTT, then do their eval on their own MOS skillsets, which are related to your position/level in the Unit ( Level 1- Enlisted E1-E4, Level 2 E5/Team Leader, Level 3/E6 Squad Leader, Level 4 E7/Platoon Sgt) . If you can’t show proficiency in the common tasks of First Aid, Commo,  Land Nav, Movement as a Buddy Team and in a patrol, and proficient accurate use of your primary weapon, when even a Dental Hygienist in the Army has to do it every year, how do you plan on functioning in an “Infantry” type role?

Find a friend that has an Army or Marine Corps background (I’m using the US Army, because that is what I know and understand what their requirements are, and I know the Marine Corps consider everyone a “Rifleman first”), and ask them to help you become proficient. I don’t know what basic Air Force and Navy teaches everybody, and that’s why I haven’t recommended them. They would be on a case by case basis, and their job in their respective service would be the indicator of the knowledge you seek (example: Security Forces, Para Rescue, Combat Control, or SERE in the Air Force, and Pilot, SEAL, SWCC, or SERE in the Navy comes to mind).

Either continue making excuses for doing little or nothing of substance in your preparations (“Mom, the bad man called me a child!”), or get it done! You have no one to blame but yourself if you’re not even a speed bump in the thugs movement to power. For God’s sake, at least be a Damned speed bump, you owe your family that much. Train and Prepare yourself Spiritually, Mentally and Physically, and get your logistics in order.

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Common Infantry Tasks Testing-The Basic Requirements Applied To Survivalists

This is a follow up on a line I used in a recent post which was, “Are there Infantry skills that you should master? Hell Yes!” In the past, I posted about the Army’s Common Task Testing these are the standards every soldier has to perform and show proficiency in every year. This is an Infantry only version of that same “Tasks, Conditions, and Standards” type testing. This is Level 1. Level 1 is for the Private (PV2), PFC, and Specialist in the enlisted ranks. This is the lowest and most basic level of requirements the Infantry expects from it’s Soldiers. As with the CTT post, I have selected what I believe are the realistic tasks that a Survivalist who mean to go into harms way should have a basic understanding of, if not proficiency in. To use the recommendations here, go to the link posted below and look up the block you desire to learn the tasks, conditions and standards for. Below the first block, there is an example of the tasks, conditions, and standards for “Operate Telephone Set, TA-1/PT”.

Infantry common tasks0

Infantry common tasks1

Infantry common tasks2

Infantry common tasks3

Infantry common tasks4

Infantry common tasks14

Infantry common tasks12

Infantry common tasks13

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Common Infantry Tasks Testing-The Level 2/3/4 Requirements Applied To Survivalists

 

In February, we talked about Common Tasks that everyone in the Army has to show competence in. Last week we discussed the basic Infantry testing done in an Infantry unit which shows they have competence in the tasks they are required to know. Today we’re gonna discuss some of the tactically applicable Survivalist skills you need to be at least familiar with, if not show some competence in if you are in any level of leadership in your group. In the Army Infantry, level 2 is a Sergeant/(4 man) Fire Team Leader, level 3 is a Staff Sergeant/(9 man) Squad Leader, and level 4 is a Sergeant First Class/(40 man) Platoon Sergeant.

Infantry common tasks level 2-1

Infantry common tasks level 2-2

Infantry common tasks level 2-3

Infantry common tasks level 2-4

 

Infantry common tasks level 2-5

Infantry common tasks level 2-6

Infantry common tasks level 2-7

Infantry common tasks level 2-8

Go through the manual and review the tasks, conditions, and standards for each task. Hopefully, this is helpful in trying to figure out what martial skills might be applicable in a Survivalist scenario.

JCD

American by BIRTH, Infidel by CHOICE

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