An Updated “Jed Eckert” Rifle

An Updated “Jed Eckert” Rifle

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As a teenager I remember watching “Red Dawn” the first time and thinking, “WOW, that’s all they had to choose from in a gun shop?”. A .308, a .38 Special (revolver), a 12 Gauge shotgun and a 30-30 Winchester lever gun (a Marlin). Lookin’ back I realize they actually had a pretty good assortment of firearms for survival purposes, but out of all those firearms, I always thought the short, light, Ruger “Ultralight” in .308Win. that the “Jed Eckert” (Patrick Swayze) character carried was the best choice for a “Survival Rifle”out of the selection they had.

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“Jed Eckert” with his Ruger M77 Ultralight in .308 Winchester.

One of my issues with firearms over the years has been being a left-hander in a right-handed world. Except for a few weapons systems like the M-60, weapons in the military never gave me issues shooting them left-handed, and I got around the ones thast did. On the other hand, bolt-guns were always an issue when it came to shooting quickly and correctly.

No bolt action rifle type out there is as reliable and dependable as a Mauser type action. Solid lock up. as robust an extractor as is available, and the fixed ejector is solid and dependable. Compared to the small surface grabbing, claw extractors and plunger type ejectors of most other bolt action rifle types made today, the Mauser action wins, hands down, as the durable, reliable, “Go To” bolt type action in a survival rifle.

For all it’s PC faults, Ruger makes great guns. I’ve owned a dozen or so Ruger firearms over the years, and one of the thing I will give Ruger is the fact that they put the extra effort into making firearms for both right and LEFT-handers in most models. I’ve owned three of the M77 rifles. A left handed .300WinMag, an older right handed, tang-safety, Heavy Barreled .308Win. (I like right handed guns when shooting from the prone), and the most recent “Gunsite Scout” rifle in .308 Winchester

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Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle with four 10 round mags and mag carrier.

I always liked the idea of the Cooper “Scout Rifle” concept to a point, but having had a few rifles with long eye relief, low powered (2 3/4-4x) scopes, I’m not the biggest fan of the forward scope mount in execution. The first scope I ever used was a 4x on my BB gun (Dad made me get good with irons first). Next, I had a 3-9x on my Savage 24 .223Rem./20Gauge combo gun. I also used a 3-9x on my Father’s Springfield ’03 (another awesome Mauser action) for deer hunting. So when it came time to scope my Scout Rifle, I put an older 1″ Sightron 3-9x MilDot that I had on it, and mounted it in Leupold Quick Detach, Zero Hold rings .

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First Mauser action rifle I ever used. A Springfield 1903, 30-06

For a multi-purpose Survival/Hunting rifle, I think the 3-9 power scope gives the most bang for the buck. If the rifle is up to it, accuracy wise, the 9 power will give you all the range you could ever want in either scenario. For dense brush or snap shooting, 3 power will get it done easily if you’ve practiced. I normally leave it set on 6 power because it is truly a “happy medium” in an optic’s magnification for ease of use.

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Safety is in the forward “Fire” position (position 1) right behind the bolt handle in this pic.

As to the features present on my “Modern Day Jed Eckert Rifle”, let’s go over them. When I bought the Ruger Scout rifle, I picked the 18.7″ barrel over the 16.1 inch model. I figured since it was for Survival/Hunting use, 18 inches will give the ammo I usually use (Federal 168gr Match and Hornady 168gr AMAX TAP) a little more room to perform well.

Overall length is 40 inches with the flash hider and the “length of pull spacer” (it comes with a couple) I used. It weighs in at 9 1/4 pounds empty  and with optic mounted. Ten round mags weigh 1 pound. Loaded but without the extra mag in the buttstock pouch it’s 10 1/4lbs.  and 11 1/4lbs. with extra mag on the stock . Speakin’ of Mags. I have four for my Scout. All are Ruger 10 round mags. One is the steel one that came with the rifle. Three are Ruger synthetics that are slightly lighter but just as robust.

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Two 10 round mags in a mag pouch originally meant for 20 round 30 cal. mags.

It has 5/8×24 threads for a flash suppressor, a muzzle brake or a sound suppressor. This could be advantageous for obvious reasons if you are using it in a survival role, and it makes it easier for smaller framed people to shoot the .308Win. if you get an effective muzzle brake.

I bought the stainless model with a laminated stock for the obvious corrosion resistance and durability. I like a laminate stock over a synthetic because it feels and hefts more like a wood stock, but still has the durability of synthetic. I’ve always liked the feel of a wooden stock on a solid rifle. Attached to the stock is a mag carrier originally designed for one 20 round 30 cal. magazine. In it I carry a pull through bore cleaner rolled up in the bottom, and an extra 10 round mag. Also, I like Ruger’s dull stainless finish because it is very corrosion resistant, but doesn’t glow/shine in the woods due to it’s dull finish.

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One 10 round mag and a “Boresnake” go into the buttstock mag pouch.

Another feature I love about this rifle are the back up iron sights. It started out with the factory Ruger peep sights (ghost ring). The front sight is wing protected and about as solid as can be without it being brazed onto the barrel. I replaced the rear sight with a full length (it came with the forward mounting rail) rail from XS Sights and this has a built in ghost ring aperture.

Last, but not least is the Ruger 3-position safety. After using a Springfield ’03, three position safety while growing up, I absolutely love the Ruger version. The Springfield safety rotates over the top of the bolt counter clockwise from 3oclock “safe, bolt locked” (position 3), to 12oclock “safe, bolt unlocked” (position 2), to 9oclock “fire” (position 1).

The Ruger action has the safety rotate forward on the left side of the rear of the action (left handed action). It starts at the rear of the bolt, next to the firing pin protrusion where it’s in “safe, bolt locked” (position 3). It rotates forward and left about 3/8 inch to “safe, bolt unlocked” (position 2), and finally forward again, next to the bolt handle for “Fire” (position 1). It is easy and sure to flip it from “Safe” (position 2) to “Fire” (position 1) with a normal firing grip with the left thumb next the left side of the rifle.

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A three shot, 2.5 inch group at 200 meters

As far as accuracy goes, it is a 1.5 to 2 MOA (with LC Ball) rifle on average. I have shot a 2 inch group at 200 meters with my rifle and Match ammo, but that is the best, and a little smaller than the average. The only downside I see with the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle is cost. They average around $800-$900. Do I think it’s money well spent? Yes, No one else makes a Scout configured rifle left handed. Savage, and Mossberg  each make one, but none are left-handed, and they’re within $200 of the cost of my Ruger.

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Is my Scout the most accurate bolt gun I own? No, that position is owned by my Savage 10 Tactical with a TTI StraightJacket barrel system. It shoots 1/2 MOA or better out to 500 meters all day long (I don’t usually get to shoot further than that on regular basis). The downside for the Savage 10Tac is that it is a 46 1/4 inch long, 13 1/4 pound rifle with a 10x scope and a bipod. That’s 6 inches and 4 pounds heavier than the Scout.

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Savage 10 Tactical. This is the most accurate rifle I own, and the second most accurate rifle I’ve ever shot. 

The Scout and Savage Tac have different applications as rifles, and fill their intended niche perfectly. Given the choice, the Ruger Scout would be the “Grab and Go” gun as a survival/hunting piece, and I would not feel under-gunned in a wilderness survival situation with the Scout as my only rifle . Coupling the Scout with my compact 11″ ParaFAL and Glock 21 pistol as self defense guns, a .22LR rifle (I use a Marlin 880SQ for hunting and an AR-7 as a pack gun) for small game, I’d be hard pressed for a better compact survival arsenal.

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Coupled with this 11″ ParaFAL “pistol” in the same caliber as the Scout, it would be a good start to a versatile, compact, centerfire, survival arsenal. 

I hope this was able to help with your choice for a good, compact, boltgun, especially if you’re a left-hander.

JCD

"Parata Vivere"-Live Prepared.

 

 

 

Force Multipliers: My Optics Of Choice For The LP/OP

Force Multipliers: My Optics Of Choice For The LP/OP

A few things should come to mind when you think of items that are considered “Force Multipliers”. Good Commo, Night and Thermal vision, and some good optics with special features. These all make things easier and more sure when it counts.  Use of those items along with other visual aids can help positively identify (PID) friend from foe. In a combat zone, PID is a must. Even more so would be the need for PID if you and yours are to survive a WROL situation.

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Burris XTS 2575 spotting scope on left, Armasight 7×50 with M22 Mil rangefinder reticle on right. Both are no longer available for sale, but other versions of these items are readily available.

When we think of having to occupy either a permanent or temporary Listening Post/Observation Post (LP/OP), what are some of the tools you think you’d need at your disposal? In the realm of commo, for me it would be a radio and a field phone. That way you have a wireless means of commo, but more importantly, with the field phones, you have a means of commo that can’t be intercepted unless it’s spliced into on the actual wire.

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Military TA-312/PT Field Phones with 1/4 mile of wire.

When it comes to optics for an LP-OP type post, they should be geared towards “overlap/confirmation” type devices. What do I mean by “Overlap/Confirmation”? Simply this. When it comes to overlapping or confirming something with optics, I’m talking about being able to easily transition from one system to another. This is either a more powerful optic, or a different systems such as night vision or a thermal imager, to confirm whether it is a friend or foe you are observing.

 

Scenarios:

As an example, we have “Sarah the Survivalist” who has the “fortune” of pulling LP/OP duty this morning ( midnight shift) for the retreat group she is part of. It’s been a boring shift so far, but just as she’s about to drink some coffee from the thermos, she catches movement out of the corner of her eye.

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FLIR Scout 240 thermal imager. $1500 but worth every penny as a night or DAYTIME viewer.

Scenario #1

Sarah puts down the thermos, picks up her binos, and although it is still early dawn and still somewhat dark, she is easily able to confirm it was just some small birds moving in the leaves approximately 50 meters away. Sarah is using a pair of 7×50 binos that are easy to use and are well equipped to see in low light, due to their large and moderately magnified lenses.

Scenario #2

Same as scenario #1 above, but Sarah can’t quite make out the movement’s source, so she pulls out a FLIR thermal viewer. Low and behold, it’s two individuals low crawling very slowly through low lying ground (shallow defilade) in the retreat’s perimeter. What the binos had a hard time making out with their non enhanced optical capability, the thermal showed very quickly what was what. Sarah calls in to the “Charge of Quarters” (CQ) desk, personnel are placed on standby and the infiltrators are engaged when they hit a trip wire flare.

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Baofeng UV-5R with handset in a UW Gear Swamp Fox 4 rig for FAL/M1A 20 rounders

Scenario #3

“Pete the Prepper” is pulling LP/OP duty one afternoon, and while scanning the treeline in his LP/OP’s area of responsibility with binos, he sees what appears to be a couple armed men approximately 500 meters away. Pete’s rifle of choice only has a 1-6x optic on it (and that won’t help with identifying the individuals at that distance), so he gets behind the spotting scope, turns it up to 40x, and sees it is a neighbor with his sons and they are carrying rifles and an ax. Although Pete could identify that they were armed while using the binos, but he could not positively identify (PID) those guys without the more powerful optical capability that the spotting scope provided.

Scenario #4

“Pete the Prepper” is pulling night duty at the LP/OP and it is raining with a bit of light fog. The 7×50 binos that are in the LP/OP don’t do much except show ghosts. Pete has been using the PVS-7 night vision goggles with a 5x magnifier screwed on the objective lens for the last couple hours. The Night Optical Device (NOD) works ok to a point for this night, but Pete sees something moving in the distance, and he can’t make out what it is, due to the light fog. It is about 175 meters out, and he only sees fleeting images of it as it moves from left to right towards the perimeter wire.

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Polish flare pistol with colored (short) flares and white illumination (long) flares in holster/case. Illumination flares are getting hard to find.

 

Pete gets out the FLIR thermal viewer and is immediately able to see it is a lone gunman creeping towards the perimeter of their retreat. Pete calls his security counterpart sitting at the CQ desk, over the field phone, and a “Stand To” is alerted. When all security posts are manned, he fires an illumination flare which catches the individual out in the open. At that time, the individual opens fire and is engaged by the members of the retreat.

 

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5x magnifier screws directly into the front of a PVS- 7 and 14. On the 7’s it’s like 5x binos at night.

Scenario #5

One evening, “Isaac the Idiot” is “pullin’ security” as his buddies call it. His group has all the latest high end rifles from SCAR’s to Knight Armament SR-25’s to LWRC piston guns. Of course all of them have high end Nightforce or Leupold scopes or ACOG optics on their rifles, so when it came time for other, more boring items like quality binos and night vision, they all bought the $25 Walmart specials and $125 “Gen 1” goggles because they spent the coin on what looked good in their “Tacti-selfies” on social media.

As Isaac is sittin’ there, he thinks he sees movement in the clearing in front of him. He looks with his binos…nothing. He looks with his night vision and all he sees is an unidentifiable, dark blob. He pulls up his high end, super deluxe Leupold MK4 LR/T 10×40 Mildot scope mounted to his SCAR-H, and what does he see? He sees a dark blob running directly towards his position! Holy Cow! No one is supposed to be back from the patrol for another day or so! INTRUDER…..BANG!

Isaac just shot a member of his group. That member was part of a reconnaissance patrol they sent out the afternoon before to see what was going on in their area. That patrol had been ambushed, and “Louis the Lucky” had been wounded and was the only survivor of that patrol……until Isaac. Isaac had nothing to be able to positively identify anything in his LP/OP area of responsibility at night. Just like their lack of planning to have the optics needed for situations like this, Isaac’s group had not gone over a “Challenge and Password” or what a running password is, and how to use it.

Optics play a big role during the day, and special optics can play an even bigger role at night (when you should expect an attack). The basics for night observation start with a good pair of 7×50 binos. It has been shown that the 50mm objective lens size, combined with no more than a 7 power magnification, make for an extraordinary combination to see in very low light.

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M-22 Military rangefinder reticle available is some binoculars

7×50’s also work well during the day, and combined with a good spotting scope, will positively identify objects out to, and beyond, realistic engagement ranges. a good 20-50x spotting scope will get the job done, and there are many on the market. Another advantage of binos is the availability of a built in range finder scale (M22). By the way, If you are at a fixed location or even a temporary one, you should have a Range Card (post for another day) made for every position on the perimeter.

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Older commercial Coincidence style range finder from Bushnell that I’ve had since ’94

Even if you are in a temporary patrol base, a basic range card should be developed. A nice to have for doing this is some type of range finder. Whether it’s a “no batteries required”, “coincidence” type (Bushnell) or the battery operated old or newer laser type (Leica, etc.) range finders. Both will do the job.

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A Lieca LRF 1200 rangefinder I bought in 2002, and a pair of Apollo 10×40’s I bought in 1989. Both are durable and have been through a lot.

Night time LP-OP duties can be difficult in many ways. You’re probably fighting off sleep. If you’re tired, you will see things that aren’t there. Worst of all is if it is bone chilling cold, since this just adds insult to the other issues you are already dealing with. Having quality gear to positively identify what you are seeing is crucial to make sure you don’t engage an innocent.

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You don’t always have the opportunity to use your rifle optics for detailed observation. The rifle on the left only has a 1-4x scope, while the one on the right has a 4-16x.

Of all the items mentioned in this post, I recommend you at least have a good pair of 7×50 bino, and a thermal imager. The binos are good for the majority of things you will need to observe in an LP-OP setting, and the thermal viewer will help discriminate the difference between a friend or foe whether day or night.

Hopefully, this post has given you some ideas of what scenarios you should plan for, and what you will need to survive them. We have the benefit of many durable, quality “Force Multipliers” available to us these days. It makes sense to at least minimally equip yourself with a few to give yourself every advantage possible.

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Night vision on rifle and helmet, IR laser on the rifle for use with the goggles and good commo. These are force multipliers that are not only available to Soldiers, but are available to you as a civilian.

JCD

“Parata Vivere”-Live Prepared.

BTW, if you’re wondering why posts have been light for the last few months, I have been spending most of my time posting older posts from here over at American Partisan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Backpacker’s Woodstove

When planning for a worst case scenario, many things have to be taken into account. One of your primary considerations is how you will cook your food and heat/boil water. Heating your living space is also a consideration in cold weather, but the first two considerations are an “All year round” proposition.

Recently, I purchased a wood stove made by Firebox. The model I purchased was the G2 Folding Firebox Stove. Along with it, I also bought the Extended Grill Plate. Why did I purchase a small woodburning stove? The answer is pretty simple when you think it through. My primary stove has been an MSR Whisperlite International for about 28 years. It is a multifuel stove, works well in every environment I’ve used it in, and has the ability to use a lot of the liquid fuels available. Problem is, what if liquid fuels aren’t available?

I know, I know….I can just make a fire on the ground, right? But what if you can’t? Some places you might train or use now have a fire ban in effect a lot or most of the time, and although you can use your liquid fuel stove in those areas, you can’t use them for long if it is needed for staying warm. Also, what if you want to reduce or eliminate the “sign” left by a fire because you feel it might lead others to you?

Regardless, I figured I’d try one of these stoves out as an “All of the above” option. Below are my impressions gleaned from using it at a recent MDT Wilderness Survival class, and in this case, they are all favorable.

Because I was in a hurry, I placed the extended grill diagonally across the top of the stove while boiling a cup of water. Fortunately, you can do that with the extended grill due to it’s length.

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Above shows the cordura case that’s available. The only attachment point is a D-ring that is attached at the top of the case. The inside of the case has two pockets for storage.

The stove and the extended grill both fit in the case.

The different pieces of the stove. Clockwise from top left. Draft Plate, Fire Sticks, Extended Grill and the Stove Body which is partially unfolded.

A view from the top of the stove. On the right side, you can see the stove floor is partially unfolded. To use, it is pushed down and snaps into place on the bottom.

The Draft Plate slides into the bottom and is held in place with one of the Fire Sticks, and the other Fire Stick is used to adjust the draft by pushing in or pulling out the plate.

A pic of how the Draft Plate works by blocking or allowing air into the bottom of the stove.

To record the times for each part of the stove test, I started with a fire made just as I would in the woods for cold, wet conditions.

The wood used for the “Boil” test was mostly from the pile in the bottom left of the pic and some from the pile on the right side. Small sticks to start, and up to 3/4″ sticks to keep it going. The thicker stuff can be used for heating by taking the cook plate off of the top of the stove and feeding them in. It puts out a lot of heat!

Fill the stove with small sticks “pencil size” or smaller. I leave an area open directly in the center to place the fire starter (in this case a small piece of fatwood) vertically in.

Ferrocium rod starting a lint ball infused with a little vaseline and a pinch of magnesium flakes starts with one strike. I then light a “pencil sized”fatwood stick that has been “feathersticked” by placing it over the burning lint tinder.

The fatwood stick will burn like a match (but much longer), even in heavy wind. I place it directly down in the center of the small stick pile, keeping it upright so it will burn up its length. The fatwood stick will burn for about 3 or 4 minutes, igniting the small sticks.

This is the fire within 4 minutes. Due to the large amount of airflow allowed to get to the fire and fuel, the fire gets hot very quickly.

The extended grill was placed on the stove at 5 minutes, along with a canteen cup of cold water. I bought the extended grill plate because it will hold two canteen cups (or the canteen and cup) at the same time, thus using your fuel more efficiently. How many single burner gas stoves can do that?

The stove can be fed with small sticks through the large hole in the side towards the bottom, shown on the left. Larger sticks can be fed through the hole under the extended grill, shown in the pic on the right.

The canteen cup of cold water was boiling within 7 minutes of placing it on the stove. From the starting of the fire, to boiling water it took 12 minutes.

There was a small amount of ash residue left on the ground when I moved the stove. If there is an issue concerning not building a regular fire (fire ban), or not wanting to leave any sign of your being there, carry a piece of heavy duty aluminum foil to place on the ground under the stove.

Total for what is shown was $86 plus shipping from Fireboxstove.com. Total weight of the stove with accessories and in the case is 2 lbs. 9 ozs.. The outside dimensions of the case with everything inside is 8″ high, 7″ wide, and 1″ thick. As an alternative to a liquid fuel stove in an area you can’t build a regular fire, it is hard to beat.

JCD

"Parata Vivere"-Live Prepared.